Monthly Archives: December 2014

QLMarkdown

Frustrated with the lack of QuickLook support for Markdown files on the Mac, I stumbled on this TidBITS article which pointed me to the open source QLMarkdown project. It’s simple to install, and it worked right out of the gate for me.

I believe iA Writer includes a QuickLook preview generator when you install it, but since I use Byword instead, I’m missing out.

Songs Perverse and Songs of Lament: Reflections on Cursive’s Accidental Masterpiece, ‘The Ugly Organ’

I remember the crowds, there was a very interesting mix of audience members. It was a weird time for rock and punk where you could have two bands like ours tour and there would be some kind of crossover there. We had done opening tours like that in the past that on paper seemed to make a lot more sense and we’d get brutalized for seven weeks, every night. But their crowds were very receptive, or at least polite. Like when we opened for Glassjaw, for example. You’d think there was more mutual interest in the fanbases. But the reception we got on the Cursive tour was far and away better than the one we got on the Glassjaw tour.

The Ugly Organ was a staple of my sophomore year of college. I remember catching the Cursive/Blood Brothers tour in Detroit.

Contacts Cleaner

I keep a recurring task in Omnifocus that reminds me to clean up my address book every six months. Previously I’ve done this by hand, and I’ve also used the built in Look for Duplicates… command.

I think I first heard about Contacts Cleaner on the Mac Power User podcast, but I finally gave it a try. It worked incredibly well, fixing a ton of mistakes that I’ve been living with for a decade (in some cases). It shows you a preview of the way it will clean up a contact:

Contacts Cleaner Resolution Interface

It sounds like I’m not alone in recommending it:

SMS Spam Reporting Service

I had no idea this existed, but my wife recently started receiving spam via SMS on her phone. To report the spam, you can just forward the message to the number 7726 (SPAM), and then the service responds to ask for the number it came from.

Apple also has a support article on how to report spam sent via their iMessage service. You’re supposed to send a screenshot of the spam to imessage.spam@icloud.com and include the full email address or phone number, and the date and time you received the message.